Simple Rose Cuttings

April 10, 2013 in Greenhouse, Make More Plants, Practical Advice by Lisa

Cardinal De Richelieu (Image Credit)

Cardinal De Richelieu (Image Credit)

For years I have wanted one specific rose.  It is an old historic rose that really isn’t grown anymore in the US.  There are a few places in the UK that still grow it, but import laws make it almost impossible for me to get plants from overseas.  I casually mentioned my want for this rose to Travis and he said, “Oh, I have one of those.”  Years ago Travis & Gabe worked for Raft Island Roses in Gig Harbor.  While there Travis amassed quite the collection of rose bushes and they are planted in his personal rose garden and at his parent’s house.  The rose I’ve been looking for happens to be one of them!  Since he told me that… oh 2 years ago… I’ve continually asked him to bring me a few slips of it.  Two weeks ago he told me he had a surprise for me.  Slips of my rose bush!  Only 2, but it more than 0.

The rose I’m talking about is Cardinal De Richelieu.  It is a big old historic rose that only blooms once a year on old wood.  With only 2 slips I was paranoid that I would screw the cuttings up terribly.  It’s been years since I’ve taken cuttings from anything.  As of today my cuttings are budding and looking nice so I’m fairly confident that my cuttings have taken.

The first thing is to assemble your supplies.  You’ll need rose slips (about a 4″-6″ long hardwood cutting).  Normally slips of roses are done in the Fall, but I got mine in the Spring so this is when I’m doing it.  You will also need a sharp pair of pruners, a container of potting soil, rooting hormone and a pencil.

IMG_2311My soil medium is a combination of coconut coir and sand.

Make sure the soil is moist and then use the pencil to make holes in the soil.

IMG_2315Take a fresh cut off of the slip right below a bud.  Ideally you want 2 buds to be below soil level and 2 above soil level.

Slip before the cut

Slip before the cut

You will also want to use the sharp pruner like a knife and scrape off a piece of the bark.  Don’t dig too deeply and only make one slice. (I didn’t take a photo of that part).

After the cut

After the cut

Dip the cutting (up to that second bud) in rooting hormone.  If you are using powdered hormone make sure to tap off the excess powder or else the stem may rot.  Gently place the cuttings into the holes made with the pencil and firm the soil around them.

Rose Cuttings

Rose Cuttings

Place the cuttings in a bright warm area and mist them regularly.  I am keeping my cuttings in my greenhouse since it is moist and warm in there.  We are making an attempt to also root a few cuttings in the back room at the store.  In that case we are using a grow light, a heat mat and a mist bottle.  My greenhouse cuttings are working a little better, but that is a given.

Have you ever rooted any cuttings?  What worked and what didn’t?

 

 

 

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